Home arrow DIAMOND B
DIAMOND B
Byfield Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Byfield diamond. In February, 1971, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, auctioned the large 54.74-carat diamond. It was set in a ring, and be¬longed to the late Vala Byfield. Pre¬sent disposition is unknown.
 
bye PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
bye (or byewater). A color-grading term used at the mines for diamond rough having an undesirable tinge of color. Stones in this classification usually fall between the cape and yellow grades when cut.
 
buyer's box PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
buyer's box. A special container used at sights varying in size which may hold up to 200 or 300 packets, each containing one or more rough stones. One standard size box mea¬sures 20" x 10" x 6". An itemized list of the contents is also included with the box. Stones over 14 carats are offered on an individual basis. The potential buyer, upon receipt, then takes the box into a private room where he examines the stones preferably with north lighting. A buyer must accept or reject the entire box. If accepted, the buyer's broker pays for the goods and arranges transfer of the stones to the buyer.
 
Bushimaie River PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Bushimaie River. A river in the Re¬public of Zaire, along which are lo¬cated important alluvial diamond deposits. See ZAIRE, REPUBLIC OF.
 
Burundi, Republic of PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Burundi, Republic of. A little repub¬lic in the heart of central africa along the shores of Lake Tanganyika and also one of the source areas for the Nile River. Important to the diamond trade as being one of the main out¬lets for Diamonds smuggled out of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa). Bujumbura, the capital, is a trade center.
 
Burton, C. V. PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Burton, C. V. One of the early inves¬tigators into the problem of diamond synthesis. In 1905, he claimed to have produced minute diamond crystals by using an alloy of molten lead and about one percent of metal¬lic calcium to hold charcoal in solu¬tion. To separate the calcium, he in¬troduced steam into the fused mass, thus crystallizing part of the carbon. He believed that if the alloy was in a state of ignition when the steam was introduced, graphite crystals would be formed; if at a lower tem¬perature, diamond crystals. There is no proof that his experiments were successful. See SYNTHETIC DIAMOND.
 
burn mark PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
burn mark. A frosted surface effect on a fashioned diamond. It is caused by the burning or oxidation, of a diamond polished too rapidly in a mechanical dop. The heat caused by friction may build up so that the sur¬face clouds slightly under the metal jaws of the dop. A burn mark is con¬sidered to be a defect in finish.
 
Burlington Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Burlington diamond. Found in 1893 near Burlington, Wisconsin. A 2.11-carat colorless crystal. Owned by Bunde & Upmeyer, Milwaukee jewelers. burning (of diamond). See HEAT, EFFECT OF ON DIAMOND.
 
Burgess Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Burgess diamond. A 220-carat stone. Discovered on the Vaal River, Cape Province, Republic of South Af¬rica. Additional details not known.
 
bunch rings PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
bunch rings. Mass-produced rings, containing very small center di¬amonds, made to sell at low prices. They sometimes contain minute uncut Diamonds, known in the trade as roughs. The name originated when it was common practice to sell such rings tied together in bunches.
 
Bultfontein Mine PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Bultfontein Mine (Bult'-fon-tane"). The third pipe mine discovered in South africa (early in 1871), located just one-half mile from the Dutoitspan Mine. It produces the best colors of the pipe mines, al¬though the comparative perfection of its white stones is below average. Annual production was usually be¬tween 300,000 and 400,000 carats. Production was suspended in Sep¬tember, 1971 and operation resumed in June, 1974 yielding 73,968 carats.
 
bulge factor PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
bulge factor. Deduction for excessive weight retention resulting from bulge on the pavilion facets of a step-cut diamond. A series of deductions based upon excessive bulge is used in the CIA diamond evaluation sys¬tem. See BULGE, CORRECTED WEIGHT, EMERALD CUT, STEP-CUT, WINDOW.
 
Buffelhoutfontein Mine PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Buffelhoutfontein Mine. A minor diamond pipe mine in the Jagersfon-tein area, Orange Free State, Repub¬lic of South africa. bulge. A bending outward of the pavilion facets of a step-cut diamond beyond the acceptable minimum necessary to achieve the cut. When the angles between the steps of an emerald cut exceed about 5° from the recommended angle on the center row of facets, the cross sec¬tion becomes rounded. See BULGE FAC¬TOR, EMERALD CUT.
 
bubble PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
bubble. A term used loosely and confusingly in the trade to describe any transparent inclusion in a di¬amond; e.g., a tiny diamond crys¬tal or a grain of a different mineral. See INCLUDED CRYSTAL.
 
Brypaal PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brypaal. A minor alluvial diamond deposit in the Herbert area, Cape Province, Republic of South africa. Present-day yield from this digging is negligible.
 
bruter PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
bruter. A diamond fashioner who works a diamond set in a holder against another diamond spinning in a lathe in order to fashion a circular shape to the rough stone. See GIR¬DLING. bruting. See GIRDLING.
 
Brunswick Yellow Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brunswick yellow diamond. Repor¬tedly the favorite diamond of the Duke of Brunswick. This 30-carat diamond of Indian origin was pur¬chased at auction by Tiffany & Com¬pany in Geneva in 1874.
 
Brunswick Blue II Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brunswick Blue II diamond. A pear-shaped blue diamond weighing 6 to 7 carats reported by Streeter (1877) to have been disposed of in the sale of the Duke of Brunswick's effects at Geneva in 1874. Formerly, it was believed by some experts to have come from the recutting of the French Blue Diamond. However, H. Tillander's recent study (1975) on "The Hope Diamond and Its Lineage" indicates that no other stones may possibly have resulted from the three recutting operations of The Tavernier Blue from which the French Blue was the first recutting. Consequently, the origin of the Brunswick Blue II is still unknown. It is possible that Streeter may have erred in his (1877) publication be¬cause in describing a similar dia¬mond in 1882, he lists the weight in two separate descriptions as 13.75 carats and 12 to 13 carats.
 
Brunswick Blue Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brunswick Blue diamond. A blue diamond reported by Streeter (1882) in two separate descriptions to weigh either 12 to 13 carats or 13.75 carats. It was named for the Duke of Brunswick, who owned it in the 19th century. Reportedly, it was disposed of in the sale of the Duke's effects at Geneva in 1874. It has now taken its place among the historically impor¬tant Diamonds that, today, must be listed as missing. Until recently, the Brunswick Blue was believed by some investigators to have resulted from the recutting of the French Blue Diamond. However, H. Tillander's re¬cent study (1975) of "The Hope Diamond and Its Lineage" indicates that it had another source. See BRUNSWICK BLUE II DIAMOND.
 
brownie PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brownie. A term used loosely in the trade to describe any diamond with a brownish tint. However, it is seldom applied to those more desirable brown stones of a pronounced color; i.e., fancy browns. See BROWN DIA¬MOND.
 
brown diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brown diamond. Although not nearly so frequent in occurrence as a yel¬low body color, brown tints in Diamonds are next to yellow in oc¬currence. In the faintest tints, brown stones are all but indistinguishable from yellows; therefore, they are graded in the same manner in the top grades. Against the river-to-light-yellow system, most graders would put a top light brown near crystal or top cape in value. Increasing tints are usually graded as slightly poorer than a comparable depth of yellow. Addi¬tional grading terms may include slightly brown, light brown and brownie. Stones with a deep-brown color are considered fancies, and an order of decreasing desirability might be reddish brown, clove brown and coffee brown. See COLOR GRADE, RIVER- TO-LIGHT-YELLOW SYSTEM.
 
brown cleavage PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brown cleavage. A grading term used at the mines for diamond blocks, or cleavages that are more or less brown tinted.
 
Brooke Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brooke diamond. A red-tinged rough diamond crystal of unknown weight reported as one of the only two Diamonds to have been discov¬ered in the British Isles, presumably deposited by glaciers. The exact lo¬cation of the find in 1816 is not precisely known, but believed to be along the Colebrooke River on the Brookeborough estate. Lord Brookeborough had the diamond, which he had valued at $9,500, set in a gold ring which is stored in a bank vault.
 
Bronkhorstpruit PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Bronkhorstpruit. A town in Transvaal Province, Republic of South africa, and the location of minor alluvial diamond deposits.
 
Broderick Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Broderick diamond. A 412.50-carat diamond found in 1928 in the Barkly West area, Republic of South africa. Sold to a Mr. F. N. Marcus for about £.5000. Present owner unknown.
 
Bristol diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Bristol diamond. A misnomer for rock crystal.
 
briolette PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
briolette (bre-oh-let"). A pear- or drop-shaped stone with a circular cross section, entirely covered with triangular facets. This form of cutting is very rarely encountered. Briolette of India diamond. The Briolette of India is a legendary diamond of 90.38 carats, which, if the tales about it are true, may be the oldest diamond on record, perhaps older than the Koh-i-Noor. Briolette Reportedly, in the 12th century, Eleanor of Aquitaine, the first Queen of France and later Queen of Eng¬land, brought the stone to England. Her son, Richard the Lionhearted, is said to have taken it on the Third Crusade. It next appeared in the 16th century when Henry II of France gave it to his blonde mistress, Diane de Poitiers. It was shown in one of the many portraits of her while at Fontainebleau. After disappearing for four centuries, the stone surfaced again in 1950, when the jeweler, Harry Winston of New York, bought it from an Indian Maharajah. It was resold to Mrs. I. W. Killam and bought back by Mr. Winston follow¬ing her death about 10 years later. In 1970, Mr. Winston showed the stone at the Diamond Premier for Ameri¬can Fashion Editors. The Briolette of India was sold again in Europe in 1971.
Last Updated ( Friday, 14 September 2007 )
 
brillionette PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brillionette (bree'-yon-ett"). Same as half-brilliant cut.
 
brillianteering PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brillianteering. The placing and polishing of the 40 remaining facets on a brilliant-cut diamond after the main bezel and pavilion facets have been placed and polished by the blocker.
 
brilliant cut PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brilliant cut (round). The most common style of cutting for both Diamonds and colored stones. The standard round brilliant consists of a total of 58 facets: 1 table, 8 bezel facets, 8 star facets and 16 upper-girdle facets on the crown; and 8 pavilion facets, 16 lower-girdle facets, and usually a culet on the pavilion, or base. Although the brilliant style was devised to give maximum brilliancy and fire, many stones cut in this fashion do not have the Tolkowsky proportions or angles for that purpose. Modifications of the round brilliant include such fancy shapes as the marquise, half moon, pear shape and many others. See AMERICAN BRILLIANT CUT, TOLKOWSKY THEORET¬ICAL BRILLIANT CUT.
 
brilliant PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brilliant. (1) A round brilliant-cut diamond. (2) Less correctly, any brilliant-cut gemstone. (3) As an ad¬jective, meaning highly reflective, as I he surface of a well-polished dia¬mond. See BRILLIANT CUT (ROUND). Brilliante. Trade name for man-made strontium titanate. Brilliante. Trade name for synthetic rutile. brillianteerer. The workman who places and polishes the 40 remaining facets on a brilliant-cut diamond
Last Updated ( Friday, 14 September 2007 )
 
brilliancy PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
brilliancy. The intensity of the inter¬nal and external reflections of white light to the eye from a diamond or other gem in the face-up position. It is not to be confused with scintilla-lion or dispersion. See CRITICAL ANCLE, DISPERSION, REFRACTION, REFRACTIVE INDEX, SCINTILLATION.
 
Brighton diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brighton diamond. A misnomer for rock crystal.
 
Briggs' scale PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Briggs' scale. A scale to determine the comparative toughness of the so-called brittle minerals by pressing a fragment of one mineral against .mother until one breaks, the first to break being classed as the lower in toughness. Carbonado occupies the highest position on the scale.
 
Bridgman PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Bridgman, Dr. R W. A physicist who carried out experiments in diamond synthesis in 1941 in cooperation with the General Electric Co., the Car¬borundum Co. and the Norton Co. at Harvard's Dunbar Physics Labora¬tory, which he helped to make fa¬mous for its research on the behavior of solids under extreme pressures. One experiment involved subjecting a block of pure graphite to a temper¬ature of 2800°C. at a pressure of 30,000 kilograms per square cen¬timeter. In another experiment, simi¬lar high temperatures and pressures were applied to a graphite block in which small "seed" Diamonds had been embedded. None of the exper¬iments resulted in the transforma¬tion of graphite to diamond, but Bridgman's experiments indicated that higher temperatures and pressures should bring success. See SYNTHETIC DIAMOND.
 
Brazzaville PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brazzaville. Capital of the Republic of Congo and major port on the Congo River. Although there is no local production in the Congo Re¬public, Brazzaville does export Diamonds that are smuggled in from Zaire and from the Democratic Re¬public of the Congo whose capital is Kinshasa
 
Brazilian Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brazilian diamond. A 31% carat brilliant-cut diamond fashioned in England in 1830. The stone was cut from a 90-carat rough discovered in Brazil in 1825. Disposition of the stone is not known.
 
Brazilia Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brazilia diamond. A 176.20-carat diamond that was found on the Abadia do Dourados River, Munici¬pality of Coromandel, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 1944. It was said to have been virtually flawless and light blue in color. The stone was cut in Rio de Janeiro, but its ultimate disposition is unknown.
 
Brazilian cut PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brazilian cut. A rarely used modifi¬cation of the old-mine cut with eight additional facets around the culet.
 
Brazil PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brazil. An important diamond source since the first discoveries were made in 1725. Annual production is be¬lieved to be approximately 270,000 carats; accurate figures are not avail¬able because of illicit trading and smuggling. The three principal pro¬ducing States are Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso and Bahia; of lesser importance are Goyaz, Sao Paulo, Ma-ranhao, Para, Piauf and Rio Bran-co. Principal production is from grav¬els in the river valleys. Mining is carried out on a small scale, mostly by individuals or small groups.
 
Brandewynskuil PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Friday, 14 September 2007
Brandewynskuil. A minor alluvial diamond deposit in the Wolmaransstad area, Transvaal Province, Republic of South africa. Current production averages 100 carats or less annually.
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 41 of 124
Advertisement