Home arrow DIAMONDS A-Z
DIAMONDS A-Z
Austrian Yellow Brilliant Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Austrian Yellow Brilliant diamond. Old plates show this to be an oval stone with facets covering the top, more in the style of rose cut than a brilliant. It is not to be confused with the more famous yellow Florentine Diamond. Tradition says that the Austrian Yellow Brilliant was in the Crown of the Hapsburgs, which dates back to 1602, and is believed to be the work of the court goldsmith of Rudolph II at Prague. The Crown is on view at the Hofburg in Vienna, but it does not contain a gem of this description. The Crown of the Em¬presses, however, in paintings that still exist, shows large yellow Diamonds. This Crown disappeared at the end of the Monarchy in 1918. According to officials at the Kunsthis-torisches Museum in Vienna, where the Austrian Crown Jewels are kept and displayed, there are no records of this stone today. See FLORENTINE DIAMOND. Austrian Yellow Diamond. See FLORENTINE DIAMOND. automatic cutting machine. See PIERMATIC AUTOMATIC DIAMOND POLISHING MACHINE. automatic dop. A mechanical stone holder which changes its position to grind facets semi-automatically. Used mostly for small stones.
 
Australia PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Australia. An insignificant and sporadic producer of Diamonds since diamond areas of Australia 1851, when the first discovery was made on the Cudgegong River, near Mudgee, in New South Wales. To¬ward the end of the 19th century another unprofitable deposit was found on the Gwydir River, in the vi¬cinity of Inverell. The principal pro¬ducing areas today are along the Macquarie River and at Copeton and Wellington, all in New South Wales. Practically the entire production is of industrial quality. A few minor finds have been reported in Queensland, Victoria, and West and South Aus¬tralia. Diamonds have also been re¬ported from the Mittagong area, N.S.W., in 1884. In 1976 diamonds were discovered in the Kimberleys District of Western Australia. Austrian Diamond. See FLORENTINE DIAMOND.
 
Aucamps Weiveld PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Aucamps Weiveld. A minor alluvial diamond deposit in the Herbert area, Cape Province, Republic of South Af¬rica. Recent production has been about 550 carats yearly.
 
atomic structure PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
atomic structure. The arrangement of atoms in a pattern which when repeated in three dimensions forms a crystal.
 
Atherstone, William Guybon PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Atherstone, William Guybon (1813-1898). A pioneer in South African geology. His identification of the first diamond found in South africa (1866) led indirectly to the estab¬lishment of the great diamond indus¬try of that country. He encouraged the workings at Jagersfontein and called attention to the diamantiferous pipe at Kimberley. See EUREKA DIAMOND. a
 
Astoria Mine PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Astoria Mine. A minor diamond mine in the Koffiefontein area, Orange Free State, Republic of South africa.
 
A. Steyn Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
A. Steyn diamond. Found on the Vaal River, Cape Province, Republic of South africa, in 1912. 141.25 carats. Disposition unknown.
 
Association des Negociants Impor-tateurs et Exportateurs de Diamond Taille PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Association des Negociants Impor-tateurs et Exportateurs de diamond Taille. An association of diamond dealers in Antwerp, Belgium, the purpose of which is to promote the Antwerp polished-diamond market and to protect the professional in¬terests of its members.
 
Asscher Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Asscher diamond. A 12.97-carat emerald cut exhibited by Brock and Company, Los Angeles, California, in the Fall of 1935. Reported to be orig¬inally cut by Asscher of Amsterdam, was a rather deep type of cut, of good color and clean. Whereabouts unknown. Asscher, Joseph. World famous diamond cleaver from Amsterdam who cleaved the 3,106-carat Culli-nan diamond on February 10, 1908. His fee was that he retain the small cleavage pieces that remained from the original stone. Asscher's Diamond Works. A famous Dutch firm of diamond cutters, who, in 1907, were entrusted with the cut¬ting of The Cullinan Diamond. The firm also was responsible for the cleaving of the Excelsior Diamond, in 1903.
 
Asscher cut PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Asscher cut. A fully made emerald cut with very large corners.
 
Ashberg Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Ashberg diamond. Shown at the 1949 Amsterdam Diamond Exposi¬tion, this 102-carat light-yellow dia¬mond was mounted in a necklace with other Diamonds and Gemstones. It is said to have been part of the an¬cient Czarist Russian Crown Jewels that were brought to Sweden after the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917. In 1959, the diamond was offered for sale by the Bukowskis auction house in Stockholm; however, it failed to reach its reserve and was withdrawn. It was sold later by its owner, Mr. Ashberg, through a dealer to an un¬disclosed buyer.
 
Arkansas Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Arkansas diamond. A 17-carat rough yellow octahedron reportedly from Murfreesboro, Arkansas. This dia¬mond crystal was loaned to De Beers Consolidated Mines Limited by the Smithsonian Institution for "The Jewel Box 1967" display, a part of the Rand Easter Show in Johannesburg. Not to be confused with the Star of Arkansas Diamond, 15.33 carats rough, 8.27 carats cut, or the Searcy Diamond, also known as the Arkan¬sas Diamond, but weighing 27.21 carats rough. Arkansas Diamond. See SEARCY DIAMOND. Arkansas diamond. A misnomer for rock crystal from Arkansas
 
Arkansas PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Arkansas. Diamonds were discov¬ered by John W. Huddleston in 1906 on Prairie Creek near Mur-freesboro, Pike Co., Arkansas, in a kimberlite dike similar to those in South africa. Later, three other pipes were found. Although a number of companies have been formed since the initial discovery, none of the min¬ing ventures has been commercially Murfreesboro, Arkansas profitable. Most of the stones recov¬ered have been small and suitable only for industrial purposes. The principal pipe is advertised as the "Crater of Diamonds State Park," to which the public is invited to search for diamonds for a fee. See AMARILLO STARLIGHT diamond, EISENHOWER DIAMOND, GARRY MOORE DIAMOND, SEARCY DIAMOND, STAR OF ARKANSAS DIAMOND, UNCLE SAM DIAMOND, STAR OF MURFREESBORO.
 
Area G M U PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Area G. A major gem-diamond-producing area in South-West africa that is located just a few miles north of the mouth of the Orange River. It is operated by Consolidated Dia¬mond Mines of South-West Africa, Ltd. See SOUTH-WEST AFRICA. Area M. An abbreviation for Mittag, a major gem-diamond-producing area in South-West Africa that is situated along the coast about 30 miles north of the town of Oran-jemund. It is operated by Consoli¬dated Diamond Mines of South-West Africa, Ltd. See SOUTH-WEST AFRICA. Area U. An abbreviation for Uubvley, a major gem-diamond-producing area in South-West Africa that is located on the coast to the north of Area G. It is operated by Consolidated Diamond Mines of South-West Africa, Ltd. See SOUTH¬WEST AFRICA.
Last Updated ( Thursday, 13 September 2007 )
 
Arcot Diamonds PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Arcot Diamonds. The Arcots, two well-matched pear-shaped diamonds that weigh a total of 57.35 carats, were first recorded as having been given to Queen Charlotte of England in 1777 by the Nawab of Azim-ub-duala, ruler of Arcot, India. The two large gems were one of several trib¬ute gifts of Indian princes to Queen Charlotte. On her death in 1818, she specifically named the Arcot Diamonds in her will, directing that they be sold for the benefit of her four remaining daughters. Purchased by Rundell, Bridge & Co., Crown Jewelers, they were held until the death of Bridge and the sale of the business; then in 1937, they were of¬fered at auction in London. The Marquess of Westminster bought them for £ 11,000 and subsequently had them set in earrings for the Duchess. In 1930, the Parisian jeweler, Lacloche, mounted the Ar¬cots in the so-called family head¬piece of the Westminsters, together with 1,421 smaller diamonds and a 32.20-carat central brilliant-cut diamond. In June, 1959, the third Duke of Westminster, William Gros-venor, decided to sell the headpiece, including the Arcots, at Sotheby's. A Bond Street jeweler predicted that it would bring at least $255,000; how¬ever, in one of the largest single-jewel sales at any auction, its owner¬ship was transferred to Harry Win¬ston, New York City gem merchant, for $308,000. The two diamonds are now privately owned in Texas.
 
Archduke Joseph Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Archduke Joseph diamond. In June, 1961, a diamond that formerly be¬longed to the Archduke Joseph of Austria came up for auction at the well-known London auction house of Sotheby's. It was described as "a magnificent diamond of elongated cushion shape and of mixed cutting, weighing 78.54 carats." According to Sotheby's catalog of the jewel sale, it was believed to be the largest un¬mounted diamond of this quality ever to be offered at auction in Great Britain. It failed to reach its reserve and was withdrawn. Present owner unknown.
 
Arabian Magic Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Arabian Magic diamond. A mis¬nomer for synthetic colorless or light-golden sapphire. Arc Diamond. A 381-carat South Af¬rican diamond crystal that was found in the Gong Gong diggings on the Vaal River, Cape Province, Republic of South africa, in 1921. Its present whereabouts is unknown.
 
appraisal PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
appraisal (of diamond). A monetary evaluation of a diamond or diamond jewelry, usually for insurance or es¬tate purposes. An insurance appraisal is based on an estimate of retail re¬placement value, and an estate ap¬praisal at estimated realization from a quick sale. An appraisal leaves no room for misinterpretation only when it pictures or describes the piece in detail, giving color and clar¬ity grades, all proportion characteris¬tics, exact measurements of stones, and plots of any inclusions, flaws or blemishes on or in Diamonds or other Gemstones above melee size. This affords protection in the event of loss or damage.
 
aplanachromatic lens PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
aplanachromatic lens (ah-plan'-ah-kro-mat"-ik). A lens free from both chromatic and spherical aberration. See ABERRATION. aplanatic lens (ap'-Iah-nat"-ik). A lens free from spherical aberration. See ABERRATION.
 
Antwerp Rose Cut PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Antwerp (or Brabant) Rose Cut. A rarely used rose style of cutting hav¬ing a six-sided girdle outline, a flat, unfaceted base, and a pointed, dome-shaped crown covered with 6 triangular facets above 6 quadrilat¬eral facets which lie adjacent to the girdle. This brilliant cut was de¬veloped in Antwerp about 1880. A.P. The abbreviation for absolutely perfect.
 
Antwerp qualities PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
"Antwerp qualities." Trade term for the Diamonds cut by Belgian diamond industry, especially for the cutting of difficult small and poor quality stones such as cleavages, macles, flats, and coateds.
 
Antwerp Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Antwerp diamond. A large dia¬mond, supposed to have been pur¬chased in Antwerp in 1559 by King Philip II, of Spain, as a gift for his third wife, Elizabeth, youngest daugh¬ter of Henry II of France. Report¬edly weighed 47.5 old carats.
 
Antwerp PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Antwerp. The most important diamond-cutting center in the world and a major distribution center for polished goods. All sizes and shapes of rough Diamonds are cut in Antwerp, in contrast to many other centers, at which a limited range of sizes and/or shapes are fashioned. By agreement with the Diamond Corpo¬ration, Ltd., some types of misshapen crystals and cleavages are made available mainly to Belgian cutters, ihus enlarging the potential of the industry. See CUTTING CENTERS.
 
Anton Dunkels Diamonds PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Anton Dunkels' Diamonds. Anton Dunkels, a distinguished diamond merchant and head of the firm of A. Dunkelsbuhler & Co. in the early days of the South African diamond fields, gave this necklace its name. Composed of large (size unknown) fancy-colored and black-diamond drops, it is one of the world's most notable pieces of jewelry neckwear. In 1959, the piece was one of the features of the Age/ess Diamond Exhibition in London, sponsored jointly by De Beers Consolidated Mines, Ltd., and Christie, Manson & Woods, the famous London auction house.
 
anomalous double refrac¬tion PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
anomalous (or strain) double refrac¬tion. A doubly refractive effect in a normally singly refractive gemstone, a condition resulting from internal strain, which, in turn, is caused by inclusions or structural irregularities within the stone. It is seen as irregu¬lar, or patchy extinction when the stone is rotated in the dark position of the polariscope. Anomalous dou¬ble refraction may be encountered in any of the amorphous or cubic (isometric) materials; examples are garnet, diamond, synthetic spinel and glass. In diamond, it often indi¬cates a state of sufficient strain to serve as a warning that the stone should be given special care in cut¬ting, setting and repair work. Also, since almost all Diamonds incorpo¬rate both Type I and Type II material, diamonds show some degree of birefringence. See ANISOTROPIC, INTERNAL STRAIN, ISOTROPIC, POLARISCOPE, REFRACTION.
 
Anniversary Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Anniversary diamond. A 65-carat pear-shape cut by Baumgold Brothers of New York in 1951. The rough weighed over 200 carats and was discovered at the Jagersfontein Mine. The Anniversary Diamond was named from its exhibition in Toronto on the 75th anniversary of the Baumgold firm. It was later sold to a private owner in Canada.
 
Annex Kleinzee PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Annex Kleinzee. An alluvial diamond deposit adjacent to the Kleinzee Mine, Namaqualand, Re¬public of South africa. It is operated by De Beers Consolidated Mines, Ltd. See NAMAQUALAND.
 
anisotropic PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
anisotropic (an-ice'-oh-trope"-ik). Crystalline substances in which the velocity of light waves varying with the direction of propagation are said to be optically anisotropic, or doubly refractive. diamond is isotropic, or singly refractive. See ANOMALOUS DOU¬BLE REFRACTION, ISOTROPIC, POLARISCOPE, RE¬FRACTION.
 
Angola PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Angola (Formerly Portuguese West africa). An important diamond-producing country in Africa, the de¬posits of which are across the Kasai River Valley from the Republic of Zaire (Congo) alluvial fields. The mining areas are in the basins of the Cuanzo, Luachimo, Cuango, and Chicapa Rivers, all of which are tributaries of the Kasai. Exclusive mining rights held by the Companhia de Diamantes de Angola, which op¬erate the Andrada, Cassanquide and Maludi Mines. One of the last im¬portant mining companies to mechanize, the Angolan production increased from an annual average of about 750,000 carats to over an estimated 2,100,000 carats, as very primitive back-breaking labor gave way to modern equipment. Diamond production since the 1975 conflict has dropped 85%. The M.RL. gov¬ernment in Angola was negotiating with DIAMANC at the time of this writ¬ing. Estimated production in 1975 was 115,000 carats industrial and 345,000 carats gem quality.
 
Anglo-American Corporation of South Africa PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Anglo-American Corporation of South africa, Ltd. An investment and holding company that undertakes managerial, technical and other ser¬vices on behalf of mining com¬panies, investment companies and industrial companies that it owns or controls. The Corporation has sub¬stantial interests, direct and indirect, in the following companies that are related to the diamond industry: Consolidated Diamond Mines of South-West Africa, Ltd.; De Beers Consolidated Mines, Ltd.; New Jagersfontein Mining & Exploration Co., Ltd.; the Premier (Transvaal) Diamond Mining Co., Ltd.; and Wil¬liamson Diamonds, Ltd.
 
angle of refraction PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
angle of refraction. The angle formed inside an optically dense medium measured between the normal to the refracting surface and the refracted ray. See CRITICAL ANGLE, CRITICAL ANGLE CONE, NORMAL, REFRACTION, REFRACTIVE INDEX.
 
angle of reflection PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
angle of reflection. The angle mea¬sured between the normal to the re¬flecting surface and the reflected ray of light. The angle of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence. See ANGLE OF INCIDENCE, and diagrams of ANGLE OF REFRACTION, TOTAL REFLECTION.
 
angle of incidence PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
angle of incidence. The angle mea¬sured between the normal to the re¬flecting surface and the incident or approaching ray of light. The angle of incidence is equal to the angle of reflection. See ANGLE OF REFLECTION, and diagrams, of ANGLE OF REFRACTION, TOTAL REFLECTION.
 
Amsterdam Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Amsterdam diamond. This rare diamond of African origin is reported to be completely black. A 145-faceted pear-shaped stone weighing 33.74 carats was cut from a 55.85-carat rough. The stone was first shown in February 1973, at D. Drukker & Zn., Amsterdam, and later exhibited in 1975 as a showpiece for the 700th anniversary of Amsterdam, the "Diamond City." Another name for the Orloff Diamond.
 
American Gem Society PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
American Gem Society. Professional society of fine jewelers numbering 1387 firms and 1766 individuals in the United States and Canada. Pur¬pose: to promote high standards of business ethics and encourage gemological education among its members, in order to further the growth of the fine-jewelry business. The Society awards the titles of Registered jeweler and Certified Cemologist to qualified members and member firms. Established in 1934. Headquarters: 2960 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90010. See REGISTERED JEWELER, CERTIFIED GEM-OLOGIST, REGISTERED SUPPLIER.
 
American Diamond Mining Corp PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
American diamond Mining Corp. A company that was organized in 1950 to mine, and sell shares in, the Ar¬kansas diamond deposits.
 
Brilliant Cut PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Brilliant Cut (also called Tolkowsky Theoretical Brilliant Cut). A label that has come to refer to fashioned Diamonds with the propor¬tions and facet angles that were worked out by trial and error by mas¬ter American cutters to yield the maximum in brilliancy consistent with a high degree of fire and con¬firmed mathematically by Marcel Tolkowsky. It should not be inferred from the name that such stones are cut only in America, or that most stones are cut only in America, or that most stones that are cut in America conform to these standards. Unfortunately, this term has been used also to describe spread, thin-crowned stones. See BRILLIANT CUT (ROUND); MORSE, HENRY D.; PROPORTIONS; PROPORTIONS, GOOD; TOLKOWSKY, MARCEL. American Cut. See TOLKOWSKY THEORETI¬CAL BRILLIANT CUT, AMERICAN BRILLIANT CUT.
 
Amati Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Amati diamond. Stolen in 1949 from Mrs. N. Coffin, wife of the late short-story writer, Damon Runyon. 31 carats. Maiden name of Mrs. Cof¬fin was Amati. stone a family heir¬loom. No further information avail¬able.
 
Amarillo Starlight Diamond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Amarillo Starlight diamond. A 16.37-carat rough diamond found in August, 1975, at the Crater of Diamonds State Park, Murfreesboro, Arkansas. W. W. Johnson, the dis¬coverer, who is a retired school maintenance man, named it after Amarillo, Texas, his hometown. The stone was unofficially reported to be flawless and estimated to be worth about $100,000.
 
Almazjuvelirexport PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Almazjuvelirexport. One of four Russian state corporations, control¬ling 80% of Russalmaz in Antwerp. As early as 1970, Almazjuvelirexport in conjunction with N.V. Antwerp diamond Company, organized exhibitions of Russian Diamonds, jewels and pieces of goldsmith's art in Brussels. See RUSSALMAZ.
 
alluvial sorting PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
alluvial sorting. The concentration of harder or tougher materials by stream action. Diamonds from low-grade original sources may be con¬centrated in alluvial deposits, thus making mining commercially profit¬able. See ABRASION, ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS, GEM GRAVEL, POTHOLE, RIVER DIGGINGS, WET DIG¬GINGS.
 
alluvial deposits PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
alluvial deposits. All deposits laid down on land by the agents of erosion, including streams, wind, waves and glaciers. Many gems, including Diamonds, are found in this type of deposit. See ABRASION, ALLUVIAL SORTING, ELUVIAL, GEM GRAVEL, POTHOLE, RIVER DIG¬GINGS, WET DIGGINGS.
 
allotropy (al-lot"-tro-pee) PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
allotropy (al-lot"-tro-pee). The capacity of the same element or compound to exist in two or more conditions with different properties. Carbon, for example, crystallizes in the cubic system as diamond, in the hexagonal system as graphite, and exists in an amorphous state as char-coal. See ALLOTROPE.
 
allotrope (al"-oh'trope) PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
allotrope (al"-oh'trope). One of the forms assumed by an allotropic sub¬stance; e.g. diamond, graphite and carbyne are allotropes of carbon. Al-lotropes are to elements as poly¬morphs are to compounds. See ALLO- EROPY.
 
Allmana Avenska, Elektriska Ak-tiebolaget (A.S.E.A.) PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Allmana Avenska, Elektriska Ak-tiebolaget (A.S.E.A.). A Swedish company which reportedly produced the first repeatable synthesis of Diamonds in 1953, two years before General Electric's announcement in 1955. Under the direction of B. von Platen, A.S.E.A. made diamond crys¬tals under a millimeter in size in a hollow sphere of soapstone with a thermite inner sphere containing tantalum and a reagent of iron carbide and graphite using pressures of 80,000 to 90,000 atmospheres at temperatures of about 2760°C.
 
Algemene Nederlandsche Diamant¬bewerkersbond PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Algemene Nederlandsche Diamant¬bewerkersbond. The principal organi¬zation of diamond cutters in Holland.
 
Algemene Diamantbewerkersbond Van Belgie PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Algemene Diamantbewerkersbond Van Belgie. The principal organiza¬tion of diamond cutters in Belgium.
 
Alexite PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Alexite. Trade name for man-made yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG).
 
Alexander Bay PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Alexander Bay. The site of the dis¬covery of rich gem-diamond deposits in late 1926 by German geologists. Alexander Bay adjoins the south lip of the mouth of the Orange River in Namaqualand. These deposits now comprise what is known as the State diggings, the output being sold through the De Beers Central Selling Organization. See NAMAQUALAND.
 
Alamasi, Ltd PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Alamasi, Ltd. A small diamond-mining company in Tanzania, for¬merly Tanganyika Territory, africa. See TANZANIA.
 
Akim Concessions, Ltd PDF Print E-mail
Written by Administrator   
Thursday, 13 September 2007
Akim Concessions, Ltd. A dia¬mond-mining company that works alluvial deposits in Ghana (Gold Coast), africa. See GHANA.
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Results 1 - 51 of 462
Advertisement